Turn Down the Noise!

A new national survey of adults shows that people in all age groups, from millennials to seniors, think that public spaces are too loud. Here’s a link to the study. And here’s a quick graphic version.

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Forty-one percent of those polled said they were concerned that exposure to loud noise may have harmed their hearing. More than 50 percent said they worry that future noise exposure could be harmful to their hearing.

The survey, which was conducted by Crux Research for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, polled 1,007 people ages 18 to 70+. The largest percentage of participants were in the 18-24 and 70+ age groups.

Crotchety seniors who object to noise volume are the stereotype, but this new study found that dissatisfaction with the noise levels was highest in 18 to 29-year-olds. More than half of that group, however, said they found noisy environments more energetic or fun. Only 26 percent of the oldest participants agreed with that assessment..

The biggest culprits in terms of noise are live concerts (33 percent said they have not gone to concerts because of the noise level or have gone but the noise bothered them), bars or clubs (35 percent), sports events in a large stadium (27 percent), restaurants (25 percent) and movie theaters (21 percent).

The good news is that respondents across the board valued their hearing. More than 80 percent of those polled said their hearing status was extremely or very important. Almost three-quarters of 18 to 29 years olds answered that their hearing was important. A majority reported taking at least one step (moving away from speakers at a concert, using earplugs) to limit their noise exposure.

The survey did not ask about hearing aid use, but other studies show that despite this apparent awareness of hearing damage people are still not wearing hearing aids.

The survey was commissioned for Better Hearing and Speech Month, which is May.

Musicians Do It. Why You Should Too.

Musicians wear earplugs that allow them to hear the music without wrecking their hearing. No reason you shouldn’t do the same.

An interviewer asked me the other day what I was doing for Better Hearing Month (May). Every month is Better Hearing Month for me, I said. Still, when it comes to hearing health, we can’t talk too much about prevention.

Most hearing loss is caused by noise, with age either equal or a close second. If your ears are ringing after a concert or football game, they may seem to recover but that ringing is an indication that you may have suffered permanent damage. It won’t show up on a hearing test, but …

To read the full article and learn how that seemingly temporary loss may lead to permanent damage, click here.

Click here to read about more ways to prevent hearing loss.

Loud enough to cause an earthquake. So what’s it doing to your hearing?

If you’re lucky enough to attend this coming Sunday’s NFL playoff game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers, bring your noise-canceling headphones. It might also be a good idea to tie down your valuables before you leave home. Seismographers from the University of Washington have found that the crowd noise at CenturyLink Field is so loud that it generates earthquakes. Minor ones, so far, but this is a big game.

CenturyLink Field holds the record for the loudest outdoor sports stadium, thanks to its famed 12th Man (crowd noise). The decibel level at the record-breaking game, in December 2013, was 137.6 decibels. That’s quite a bit louder than a jackhammer and just below the noise of a jet engine at fairly close range. It’s also well into the range where it can cause immediate hearing damage. (You can read more about this game and other football hearing issues here.)

Seattle Seahawks fans

Researchers from the University of Washington installed two seismometers at CenturyLink Field several years ago. In Seattle’s earthquake prone vicinity, it was big news in 2011 when running back Marshall Lynch made a 67-yard touchdown, setting off seismic activity now fondly known as the BeastQuake. Last Sunday’s playoff between the Seahawks and the Carolina Panthers also set off seismic activity.

The Seattle Times interviewed Steve Malone, professor emeritus at The University of Washington Seismologic Laboratory, after last Sunday’s game. Since TV has a 10 second lag time, he told the reporter, the seismologists were able to see the crowd reaction, in terms of seismic activity, before the play was even shown on TV. It would be good if CenturyLink Field also attracted the interest of audiologists. Maybe they could measure how many Seahawks season ticket holders have hearing loss.

One of the few people at CenturyLink Field not in danger of hearing damage is fullback Derrick Coleman, who is deaf. This gives him a distinct advantage over his teammates, because he can lip read the quarterback’s plays. Even though he can’t hear the crowd noise, he can feel it. He’s a human seismometer

Photo: AP/Elaine Thomson

Katherine Bouton is the author of Shouting Won’t Help, a memoir of adult-onset hearing loss. She has had progressive bilateral hearing loss since she was 30 and blogs about healthy living — and healthy aging — at Hear Better With Hearing Loss. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Hearing Loss Association of America.

This post first appeared on Healthy Hearing, AARP website, 1/15/15

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