Hearing Loss Won’t Kill You, or Will It?

I published this post on my Psychology Today blog, which is aimed at psychotherapists. But I thought the readers of this blog might also find it interesting.

If you are a therapist and have a patient with hearing loss, please read this to get a sense of what your patient may be experiencing.images

I lost much of my hearing gradually, over 30 years. And then, eight years ago, I lost almost all of the rest of it in a single day. Eventually I got a better hearing aid and a cochlear implant, but I never heard well again.

I was forced to leave a job I loved. Caring for my elderly parents was almost impossible because I couldn’t hear them, I couldn’t hear their health-care providers, and I couldn’t call 911 in an emergency. I flew there often, mostly for crises, because the only way I could begin to function was in person, reading lips, asking for written notes. The stress was overwhelming.

My marriage was disintegrating because of the depression and anger my hearing loss caused. My young-adult children were unable to comprehend how their mother had turned so difficult. I quit my book club. I avoided going out with friends. On election night 2008, the night of Obama’s election, I declined a friend’s invitation to watch together and stayed home alone with a bottle of wine and a box of Kleenex. I drank myself to sleep before the winner was declared.

Most nights I slept no more than two hours at a time, often dissolving into crying jags in the middle of the night. I lost 15 pounds. I thought about ways I might kill myself, assuring myself I wouldn’t actually do it. But I thought it about it too much.

Fortunately I found help. A psychotherapist provided medication and talked me through those dark months. When I developed vertigo, she worked with my ENT to help find the right drug combination to keep it under control.

Hearing loss is not a lifestyle problem, it’s not just a normal part of aging. It is a deeply disruptive loss that changes everything about the way a person lives. Isolation and depression are common responses. It contributes to cognitive decline. Society dismisses it, and this makes it even harder to cope with.

I survived my hearing loss and became an advocate for education and accessibility for the deaf and hard of hearing. I am a board member of the Hearing Loss Association of America. I wrote a memoir of my struggles with hearing loss, Shouting Won’t Help, and included my email address so people could contact me. And they do. Sometimes the emails are heartbreaking. Yesterday morning I got one from someone I had never corresponded with.

The subject line was: “Rage, Anger, Depression, Abusing Alcohol.” I responded, and as more email came in over the day, I realized the writer was in serious trouble. She was essentially alone in a distant state. After consulting with psychotherapist friends I urged her to contact a mental health professional immediately. I wish I had been able to provide a reference for her.

This person had been on medication for depression and anxiety. Her hearing loss was not new, although it was newly worse. Whoever prescribed the medication seems not to have recognized the severity of the impact of her loss, or not to have successfully dealt with it.

There’s nothing more I can do for this person, but I urge therapists to take hearing loss seriously. Acknowledge the significance of the loss. Understand that hearing aids and cochlear implants don’t always work very well. Try to understand what it’s like to lose your means of communication with others. Try to imagine what it’s like to doubt everything you think you hear. Imagine the embarrassment of repeatedly asking for clarification a third or fourth time. Many people just give up. They isolate themselves, they get depressed, they decline cognitively. Sometimes they even think about suicide. Sometimes, they even carry it out.

When I was writing my book, I included the experiences of many people who worked in jobs where hearing well is important. I interviewed psychotherapists, musicians, nurses. I wanted a teacher and finally found a high-school teacher who had been forced to leave his job because he could no longer hear his students. I heard he was depressed and drinking. Before I was able to interview him he was killed in a single-car accident. The cause was never discovered.

For more information about living with hearing loss, my books  “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You” and “Living Better With Hearing Loss” are available at Amazon.com.

The Day I Lost My Hearing

Every year I observe the day I went deaf. My life changed that day. At first it seemed nothing but negative, a catastrophe. Now I see that it gave me an opportunity, a door that opened onto a new world.

I remember the day because it was a holiday — Halloween. My hearing had been in a steady decline for three decades, but it was on Halloween of 2008 that I realized it was irretrievably gone.

I had started a new job two months earlier, and learning the routines had been stressful. Once I mastered the systems, I began to realize just how hard the actual job was, with too many elements and too many deadlines. I could tell it was affecting my health, but I was only two months into it. No turning back.

On that Monday, I had a routine flu shot. I began to feel woozy that evening, and by Tuesday I was dizzy and slightly nauseated. By Wednesday my ears were blocked. I was also hypersensitive to sound. This wasn’t the first time I’d had those symptoms, and they usually indicated a downward fluctuation in my hearing. I made an appointment with my ear, nose and throat doctor for Friday morning. I continued to suspect the flu shot as culprit, but I knew it was just my hearing, doing its mysterious disappearing act.

I live in New York, and my trip to the doctor was two subway rides. It was morning rush hour and Halloween, a frenzied combination. Teenagers in makeup shouted and roughhoused. Two businessmen hung over my seat talking loudly. A panhandler in a wheelchair hollered his pitch for donations right next to me. The noise was overwhelming. I covered my ears with my hands and shrank down into my seat. At this visit, I couldn’t hear my longtime doctor. He wrote questions for me on his computer. A hearing test confirmed the worst.

Oral steroids are a standard treatment for sudden hearing loss, and although mine didn’t fit that description, he prescribed them anyway, a blockbuster dose gradually decreasing over the next two weeks.

 

I was already stressed and overwhelmed with anxiety. Now I panicked. How could I possibly do my job with my hearing as diminished as it was? I took the rest of that day off, working from home. I sobbed and raged and sank into a fierce depression over the weekend. On Monday I went back to the office. I made vague reference to my hearing having been affected by the virus I’d had but stayed far from the truth.

My hearing never got better. I struggled through another year, pretending to myself that I was managing. I’m a good lip reader, and I set strategies in place to maximize my ability to understand. The following September I got a cochlear implant, but after three decades of profound hearing loss in that ear, it didn’t help much. Still, I thought I was getting away with it. Then a tough new boss came in. He didn’t buy it. I wasn’t a team player, he said.

I left that job at the end of the year. At first it seemed like a huge defeat. But as I gathered my strength and began to consider what to do next, I came to think of my hearing loss as an opportunity. I had been clueless about hearing loss. I thought my situation was unique. I was embarrassed to be going deaf at such a young age. I hid my hearing aids and I tried to hide my cochlear implant. I knew nothing about support groups or advocacy for people like me.

And that was my opportunity. I could share what I learned, and continue to learn, about hearing loss. I joined the Hearing Loss Association of America and found other people like me. I became an expert — writing and talking about hearing loss from the patient perspective, and eventually from the consumer perspective. It’s an interesting transition from patient to consumer. As a patient, you are mostly a passive participant, hoping for the best. As a consumer, you have rights. And as an advocate, you channel both of those roles into making your disability your strength.

I never think about that Halloween without a tinge of sadness. But out of that experience came a chance for a second act. One of the things I have found most interesting in my new life is how many other people have also been forced into a second act, by hearing loss or by other misfortune.

Many of my Hearing Loss Association of America colleagues have also become hearing-health activists, many of us working as hard at it as we ever did in our paid professions. For me, and for others, it’s also far more gratifying than my paid work ever was. And the best part — it’s given me a whole new life.

I know it’s true for others. Please share your experience in the comments section below. If yours wasn’t as positive, remember that mine also had — and continues to have — its downs as well as its ups. Nobody ever said it was easy. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its rewards.

This post was first published on AARP Heath on December 5, 2016.

For more on hearing loss and hearing health:

shoutingwonthelpLiving Better jpegKatherine Bouton is the author of “Living Better With Hearing Loss: A Guide to Health, Happiness, Love, Sex, Work, Friends … and Hearing Aids,” and a memoir, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You”. Both available on Amazon.com.

Emergency Preparedness Plans for Those With Hearing Loss

Tips that go beyond the usual for the deaf and hard of hearing.

Emergency Prep for Hearing Impaired

Tips for those with hearing loss on how to be prepared in the case of an emergency. — Getty Images/iStockphoto

Emergencies happen. Just recently, the country has seen floods, tornadoes, wildfires and terrorist attacks, not to mention a host of other catastrophes. It was also the 15th anniversary of 9/11, which ushered in a new era of emergency awareness.

It goes without saying that everyone should be prepared with an emergency plan. But for people with hearing loss, being prepared goes beyond the usual.

 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers information on its website for emergency preparedness plans, and the American Red Cross suggests what you should have in your emergency kit.

For more specific advice for those with hearing loss, the New York City chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America recently hosted a presentation on emergency planning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Representatives of New York City Emergency Management offered information about basic emergency planning, as well as these useful tips for adults with hearing loss:

  • Use “legacy technologies.” These include old-fashioned pen and paper for communicating with friends, family and emergency workers if you do not have access to your hearing aid or cochlear implant. Another legacy technology is a landline telephone. Even when cellphones, Internet, power and everything else goes, a landline may still work. Check with your provider.
  • Keep extra batteries in your emergency kit. Be sure to include batteries and chargers to keep your hearing aids, cochlear implants and assistive listening systems safe and working. You’ll want to have several packets of backup hearing-aid batteries and a sealed waterproof container in your emergency kit, for your hearing aid or cochlear implant. The bag or container should be big enough for extra batteries, chargers and assistive listening devices. Don’t forget to include your medications, written copies of your medical information, your prescriptions, and your driver’s license and passport.
  • Consider a portable battery charger. Cochlear implants are more of a challenge during an emergency because their rechargeable batteries generally last at most about eight hours. This is where a portable battery charger — or two, if you want to be extra careful — may be useful. The chargers themselves need to be charged, however, so be sparing in how you use them.
  • Don’t forget your car as a power source. Even when all other power is out, your car (depending on the model, and as long as you have gas) will have some power for charging things like a cochlear implant battery pack, your cellphone and so on. These will be charged through the USB port.
  • Flashlights are a must. They are especially important for the hard of hearing. If it’s dark, you may need a flashlight to help in reading lips. Make sure you have them in your emergency kit and in a handy place in your home.
  • Use Facebook’s Safety Check. If cellular phone service is still working, this feature allows Facebook to notify you in the event of a disaster in your area and ask if you’re safe. You click the “I’m safe” button and the message will go to your Facebook network. Facebook can also give you a list of friends who might be affected by the disaster. Facebook is selective in the disasters it covers with Safety Check, and has been criticized for implementing it in some disasters and not others, but it’s still a good way for the deaf and hard of hearing to check on friends and relatives.
  • Get a weather-alert radio. If you live in an area where tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides or other natural disasters are common, you may want a NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) weather-alert radio. They come in all price ranges, and a variety can be found by Googling “weather alert radio” or checking online at Amazon. If you are deaf or hard of hearing, you can activate a warning light. Some weather alert radios have an LCD screen for alerts.
  • Sign up for emergency alerts issued by your city or community.

  • Finally, for anyone who lives alone, hearing or not, form a support network.  Ask two or three friends, neighbors or coworkers to be in your network so you don’t go through an emergency alone. Your network partners should make a plan to stay in contact during an emergency. They also should know your medical conditions and needs, and where to find emergency and medical supplies.

From AARPHealth on 9/2916.

Katherine Bouton is the author of “Living Better With Hearing Loss: A Guide to Health, Happiness, Love, Sex, Work, Friends … and Hearing Aids,” and a memoir, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You”. Both available on Amazon.com.

No Wheelchair Ramp for the Deaf

Getting hearing access for those who are deaf or hard of hearing is a little more complicated.

No Wheelchair for the Deaf

One accommodation for the hard of hearing is an American Sign Language interpreter. But only a small minority of those who need it, use it. — Getty Images

 

 

Trying to get accommodations for those of us who are hard of hearing or deaf can be a long, tough slog.

Two years ago, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed a lawsuit against shipping giant FedEx Ground, charging it with discriminating against its deaf and hard-of-hearing employees and job applicants for years.

The EEOC alleged that the company violated federal law by failing to provide needed accommodations, such as closed-caption training videos, scanners that vibrate instead of beep, flashing safety lights and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation.

FedEx filed a motion to dismiss the suit, but this year a federal judge denied the motion. The case is still under litigation.

All of which brings me to the sticky issue of accommodations — namely, that no one type works for all. There is no wheelchair ramp equivalent when it comes to hearing loss.

Although the FedEx case involves the specific needs of a particular workplace, the problems of hearing access challenge all of us and make asking for hearing access — even for something as simple as a better-equipped lecture hall — complicated. Which access do you ask for?

One accommodation that is routinely offered is an ASL interpreter. The problem is that only a small minority of those with hearing loss (less than 5 percent) use ASL. It’s no more helpful to most than an interpreter speaking Hungarian would be.

Among the most widely used accommodations, found in theaters, houses of worship and public gathering places, are infrared or FM headsets. The person with hearing loss borrows a headset from the venue. Sound, which travels through the regular sound system and then wirelessly to the headset, is amplified. Sometimes these systems work well. More often they are helpful to those with milder losses but not for anyone else. They also work only as well as the microphone. It the microphone is badly positioned, the headsets won’t deliver clear sound.

The technology that gets people most excited is induction looping. (Here’s a short video about it.) This, too, works through the venue’s regular sound system, and the sound quality is often excellent. It consists of a wire run around the perimeter of a room that transmits a signal, again wirelessly, to the audience member’s own hearing aid or cochlear implant, set to the telecoil setting. If a hearing aid does not have a telecoil, or the user doesn’t have hearing aids, headsets similar to those used for FM devices can be worn. Sometimes hearing people use them, just to hear better.

For some, the best option is captioning. This can be open captioning on a shared screen, similar to the captions on your television or subtitles on a movie. Or it can be closed captioning, sent to your personal device (an iPhone or iPad) or one provided by a theater. Generally this kind of captioning, called CART, which I described in some detail a few months ago, is live.

Scripts can also be scanned or typed into a new device being tested by Globetitles. It sends prescreened captions to personal devices, including computer and television screens, tablets and smartphones. The captions appear as red type on a black background, so they don’t bother others. You can see a sample by clicking on the Globetitles link.

Unfortunately, no single system fits all needs. Some think captioning serves the largest number of people. Others like looping because you don’t have to do anything except change the program on your hearing aid. Live captioning could be adapted to the kind of Sony glasses used in Regal Cinemas, or something like Google Glass could put captions right before your eyes.

Most venues will probably continue to offer one form of listening assistance (or none). But if that assistance does not serve a person with a hearing disability when another type of assistance would, that person can bring a lawsuit under the ADA.

As Lise Hamlin, the Hearing Loss of America Association’s director of public policy and state development, emailed me in a discussion about accessibility: “You might be able to make a case for both a listening system and captioning under the ADA. The relevant phrase is ‘effective communication.’ The key is providing effective communication to each person who needs it. If even one person is denied effective communication, they can file a claim.”

Most of us don’t want to get involved in a lengthy lawsuit — we just want to understand the play or the sermon or the mayor’s announcement or the community meeting or the visiting candidate. Is that so much to ask?

This post first appeared on AARP Health on August 10, 2016.

Katherine Bouton is the author of “Living Better With Hearing Loss: A Guide to Health, Happiness, Love, Sex, Work, Friends … and Hearing Aids,” and a memoir, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 5o Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You”. Both available on Amazon.com.

 

Relief from the High Cost of Hearing Aids?

Last month the prestigious National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine issued a report with a series of recommendations that, if adopted, could revolutionize the way consumers receive and pay for hearing health care in the United States.images

Unfortunately, this report was not widely covered in the mainstream press, and although I wrote about this at the time, I’m also addressing it here, for those who may have missed this important development.

About 30 million Americans have hearing loss, but 67 to 86 percent of those who could benefit from hearing aids do not use them. The report called hearing loss “a significant public-health concern.” It is of course also of significant personal concern for those with hearing loss.

The June 2 report by the Committee on Accessible and Affordable Hearing Health Care for Adults represented input from experts in hearing research, public health, geriatrics and audiology, as well as from industry and consumer groups.

Consumers hope the recommendations will ultimately result in relief from the high cost of hearing aids, little insurance coverage and the limited availability of hearing professionals.

The committee listed 12 recommendations, but here are the four I consider most important.

  • Make buying a hearing aid easier by removing the Food and Drug Administration’s regulation requiring a medical evaluation or a waiver before a hearing aid can be purchased.

    It’s not difficult for consumers to waive the medical evaluation, but many people feel they are required to see a doctor before buying a hearing aid. This is a stumbling block for many. As the report pointed out, the only time a medical visit is essential is if you display “red flag” conditions, including sudden or rapidly progressing hearing loss within the previous 90 days, acute or chronic dizziness, pain or discomfort in the ear, or a visible ear deformity.

  • Promote hearing screening in wellness and medical visits.

    Most primary care doctors do not conduct even a cursory screening for hearing loss, even among the elderly. Failure to recognize hearing loss can be a threat to quality health care. A patient may not hear the doctor clearly, for instance.

  • Make lower-cost, over-the-counter hearing devices more widely available by implementing a new FDA category for them.

    This refers to personal sound amplification products, or PSAPs, and other less costly over-the-counter hearing devices.

  • Improve the compatibility of hearing technologies with other communications systems.

    This refers not only to compatibility of hearing aids with other hearing assistive devices and technologies, but also to developing “open platform” hearing aid programming. This would allow health care professionals — or, eventually, the device owner — to be able to program the settings on any device from any manufacturer, which is currently not the case.

In many ways, the report echoes the highly critical findings of a White House advisory group’s report last October. The group, as reported in the New York Times , said that industry concentration and overregulation meant that hearing aids had “not experienced the dramatic reductions in price and increases in features that have been routinely seen across consumer electronics.”

“When compared in complexity to today’s smartphones costing a few hundred dollars each,” the report said, “even premium-model hearing aids are simple devices but can cost several thousand dollars.”

The response to the White House report, as well as to these new recommendations, has varied widely among industry, consumer and health care groups — “hailed by some groups and denounced by others,” noted audiologist Barbara Weinstein, writing on the website Hearing Health & Technology Matters.

But she urged all parties to work toward common goals. “It is a win-win for all stakeholders to close the gap between the proportion of persons with untreated age-related hearing loss and the proportion of those who enjoy a measurably high quality of life as the result of hearing health care interventions purchased through audiologists.

“We are part of the problem and part of the solution. Let’s change that balance and remain essential,” she said.

One group supporting the recommendations was the Hearing Loss Association of America HLAA, the largest consumer group in the United States representing people with hearing loss. You can read HLAA’s statement here.  Many of the recommendations in the report echo earlier HLAA policy recommendations.

You can read a summary of the report here. The full report — “Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability” — is available from the National Academies Press online or by calling 202-334-3313 or 800-624-6242.

Click on the link to read.  New Report Pushes for Cheaper, Easier Hearing Aids.

 

This post first appeared on AARP Health, June 10, 2016

Katherine Bouton is the author of “Living Better With Hearing Loss: A Guide to Health, Happiness, Love, Sex, Work, Friends … and Hearing Aids,” and a memoir, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You”. Both available on Amazon.com.

 

 

 

Hearing ‘Hamilton’

Friday  night, I and 100 or so other people with hearing loss got to see Broadway’s hottest show, Hamilton – with captions!
Thank you to the Theater Development Fund’s Theater Accessibility Program!J6SdlkmX_C3yM8WhePUfE9dKaT1KkD-5NSc5drwOHkGtSoF0TeUKkBdUAfLkXCpZXloNLw=s114
The Richard Rodgers theater also has an induction loop. Thank you Nederlander theaters!
Looping is wonderful technology for many people. Here’s a list of looped spaces in the New York area. But for some of us, looping often isn’t enough. I’m one of them. That’s where captions come in.
Because of the nature of my hearing loss I have a very hard time understanding language unless I also have a visual aid – reading lips or reading captions. ASL-users, of whom there were quite at the performance, also need captions, as do many people with other kinds of hearing loss that preclude good speech comprehension.
TDF to the rescue. TDF makes theater accessible for people with all sorts of disabilities. The program for those with hearing loss has allowed me to continue to enjoy theater long after I was able to actually hear it.
The first play I saw with captions was Yasmina Reza’s hilarious satire about dueling suburbanites arguing over a playground incident. I had seen it a year earlier, without captions. Despite an excellent seat, 6th row in the orchestra. I missed a fair amount. Nevertheless in part because of the body language and my lip-reading skills, I thought I had pretty much followed it.
A year later I saw the play again, this time with captions.Seeing it with captions I realized how much I had missed, especially the jokes.
TDF, the Theater Development Fund, is a nonprofit that helps make theater accessible to underserved populations. It was founded in 1968 with a student discount program for The Great White Hope. In 1973 it opened the original TKTS booth in Duffy Square.
In 1979 it started the Theater Access Project (TAP, now called Theater Accessibility Programs), which currently has 3,200 active members. Almost 40 percent of them have hearing loss. A play or musical is live captioned, with a small screen showing the captions usually to the right of the orchestra. TAP members can buy tickets at half price for these seats, which are always in the orchestra.
There’s no fee to join TAP, though you must have proof of eligibility (a doctor’s note or audiogram). TDF-TAP offers about 40 open-captioned performances a year, including at least one performance for almost all Broadway shows.
They’re not always as special as Hamilton, the tickets for which went on sale last June and sold out within hours. But any play or musical benefits from understanding the dialogue and lyrics, and the only way to do that for many of us is through captions. It’s true that following captions can sometimes require speed-reading abilities, as was the case with the fast-paced rapping of Hamilton.
If you love theater, and if you can’t hear with looping or infrared devices, look into TDF/TAP. For more information about applying, go to the TAP page on the TDF website.
Even if you can hear – but want to help others who can’t – make a donation to TDF. You’ll be helping not only those with disabilities but theaters lovers of all ages whose only access is through TDF’s TKTS booths.

 

Would You Ask for Help With Hearing Problems at Work?

Accommodations for Hearing Loss at Work Dealing with the stigma of both hearing loss and aging at work can keep some employees from asking for accommodations — Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

Older workers with hearing problems face a double whammy: They’re dealing with the stigma not only of hearing loss but also of age. If they ask for accommodations on the job for hearing loss, they fear attention will be drawn to their age as well.

The Americans with Disabilities Act protects the rights of workers to ask for accommodations at work to help them hear more easily. However, research out of Oregon State University has found that older workers are less likely to feel there’s support for them to ask for that kind of help, because of worries they’ll be perceived as old by coworkers and managers.

Other research has shown that people with disabilitiesrefrain from requesting accommodations if they think coworkers would find the request “normatively inappropriate” — meaning not in keeping with the office culture. For instance, an office environment with a focus on maximizing profits like that in The Big Short or The Social Network is perceived as being much less likely to understand and tolerate a disability than would a nonprofit that prides itself on a more inclusive culture.

Research by David C. Baldridge and Michele L. Swift of Oregon State University’s College of Business, published in the journal Human Resources Management, studied the effect of age on such requests. Workers’ fear of seeming old, they found, may trump their fear of seeming to have a disability. Their findings were based on an email survey of 242 workers ages 18 to 69. Most had moderate to severe hearing loss.

Age itself has a negative stereotype in many workplaces, including the perception of “lower productivity, resistance to change, reduced ability to learn, and greater cost,” the authors wrote. “These stereotypes are often associated with fewer promotions, less training, lower performance ratings, and lower retention.”

But add disability to age and the stereotypes multiply. The older the person with a disability, the more likely they are to fear that others will attribute the request not to the disability, but to their age.

“Simply put,” the authors wrote, “people with disabilities appear to face a straightforward yet troubling question, ‘If I ask for a needed accommodation, will I be better or worse off?'”

In their discussion, the researchers advised managers and human resources personnel to realize that while many older employees may be eligible for and would benefit from disability accommodation, “these employees might also be particularly reluctant to make requests,” especially if they work in for-profit organizations or if the organization appears not to have others with disabilities.

When the disability is hearing loss, managers should make sure telephones have adjustable volume (and, I would add, be telecoil compatible). Large meetings should routinely include open captioning, which can also help employees with normal hearing follow what’s being said.

In an email interview, Baldridge said managers should think about the inclusion of persons with disabilities as “a normal aspect of diversity management.”

As the workforce ages, disability increases. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that about 26 percent of those ages 65 to 74 are in the workforce, and the majority are full-time workers. It’s in a company’s interest to have employees working at full capacity. If people are reluctant to ask for accommodations for a disability, their output and effectiveness are likely to suffer.

Please share your workplace experiences in the “reply” section below.

For more information about David Baldridge’s studies of disability and the workplace, email him at David.Baldridge@bus.oregonstate.edu.

For suggestions on workplace accommodations for hearing loss see HLAA’s Employment Toolkit. 

 

This post first appeared on AARP Health on June 3, 2016

Living Better jpegshoutingwonthelp

Katherine Bouton is the author of “Living Better With Hearing Loss: A Guide to Health, Happiness, Love, Sex, Work, Friends … and Hearing Aids,” and a memoir, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You”. Both available on Amazon.com.