New Hearing Aid, New Life

I haven’t written much recently, but that’s because thanks to technology — apps and equipment — I’ve been busy doing things.

It started with a new hearing aid. My top-of-the-line Phonak, which had bumped my word recognition up considerably when I got it, gradually stopped working well for me. I replaced it with the then brand-new Phonak Link, which paired wirelessly with my Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. That meant that if I was listening to a podcast on my iPhone, for instance, the sound was going to both ears. I still had to use a streamer, an intermediary device that I wore around my neck on a loop, but I was hearing with both ears. Binaural hearing helps with speech discrimination and it was a wonder to hear so well with both ears after so long. After another year or two went by, however, that hearing aid no longer sufficed.

My audiologist agreed that I was probably at the end of the line with hearing aids, and I began researching a second cochlear implant. I passed the evaluation with flying colors (which means that I failed spectacularly: my hearing in that ear was easily bad enough to qualify for a new implant). But I’ve always heard primarily through my better ear — the hearing-aid ear — and I was reluctant to give up on a hearing aid as long as I got some benefit from from it.

My audiologist suggested I try a different brand of hearing aid. What works for one user is not necessarily good for someone else, and a brand that has worked for an individual in the past may not be as beneficial in the present. In my hearing-aid-wearing life I’ve worn primarily Widex and Phonak. This time I tried the Oticon Opn, a made-for-iPhone hearing aid that had the benefit of channeling anything that came into the phone (calls, podcasts, music, soundtracks on videos) directly into my hearing aid. (The one drawback was that I was back to single-sided hearing when using the phone.)

It was not only fun to have direct access to the phone without the need for a streamer but the new hearing aid also proved to be surprisingly better for me in many conversational situations. Friends and even acquaintances remarked on how well I seemed to be hearing. I was much more confident in social situations and so went out more. When I went for a hearing test recently, my hearing in that ear had actually improved.

Equally beneficial was the lapel mic I bought as an accessory —  as well as the introduction of a couple of new apps that came out around the same time. I’ll write about both next week.

You might be thinking that I’ve bought an awful lot of hearing aids recently. The time frame is not quite as short as it sounds, but yes, keeping up with hearing-aid technology is expensive. That’s why assistive devices like an FM receiver, a lapel mic, and the Roger Pen are useful. It’s also why having a telecoil in your hearing aid is essential. Many of these assistive devices work via the telecoil, and they’re much less expensive than a new hearing aid. If your hearing aid doesn’t have a telecoil, ask your audiologist to put one in. It’s a tiny device with a big impact.

 

For more about living with hearing loss, read my books, available at Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble, and maybe at your favorite bookstore or library. If it’s not there, ask for it!

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Where Hearing Loss is the Norm

There’s one event a year where my hearing loss is not afb_nyc_chapter FB profile factor in my ability to communicate.

That’s the Hearing Loss Association of America’s annual Convention.

This year’s convention was held in Minneapolis June 21st to June 24th. I don’t know how many attended but virtually everyone was deaf or hard of hearing – or accompanying someone deaf or hard of hearing. A few audiologists also attended – it’s great to see their interest in what people with hearing loss want and need.

Convention is a mix of lectures, workshops, parties, seeing old friends and making new ones.

GIRLS OF MINNEAPOLIS
At Convention, where hearing loss is the norm.

The larger events – the keynote address, the research forum, the awards brunch – offer three different forms of hearing accommodations: a hearing loop, CART captions, and ASL interpreters. The smaller workshop gatherings provide CART, some offer looping as well, and an ASL interpreter was available on request.  My hearing loss is severe enough that I need CART as well as the loop. The Deaf may use CART to elaborate on what they hear through the ASL interpretation. It’s actually thrilling to be in a place that offers so many different ways to hear

This year’s keynote speaker was Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association. Consumer electronics are playing an ever larger role in correcting hearing loss. Shapiro’s talk was a guide to this exciting new field of hearing instruments.

The three-hour Friday morning research symposium consisted of a panel of four experts discussing listening in noise. They explained why it is so difficult for hearing aids and cochlear implants to correct for background noise, and technological innovations that  may solve this problem.

As always, there was a large exhibit hall where you could try out new devices, find out how to get a hearing dog, how to add an app to your smartphone to make it easier to understand on a cell phone. My cochlear implant manufacturer, Advanced Bionics, even made a minor adjustment to my cochlear implant at the convention, adding a small magnet to my headpiece, which had been slipping.

The themed Get Acquainted Party is always popular with newcomers and old hands alike. This year’s theme was the 70’s, complete with Go-Go dancers and hilarious costumes. On Saturday evening, Mandy Harvey, a deaf singer-songwriter who was also an America’s Got Talent winner, gave a concert for a few hundred people, some of whom could not resist getting up to dance.

Saturday night, a group went to the famed Guthrie Center for a performance of “West Side Story.”

Workshops on four educational tracks occupied the daytime hours. These tracks included Advocacy, Hearing Assistive Technology, Living with Hearing Loss, and Hearing Loss in Health Care settings. The last category is a new one for HLAA, and it addressed how people with hearing loss can make sure an encounter with the health-care system includes clear communication from health-care professional to patient, and vice versa.

In between formal events, friends met for meals, or a walk in beautiful Minneapolis, or took a trip to the Walker Art Museum and the adjacent outdoor sculpture park. Big name tags with large print make it easy to strike up conversations with new people or those you may have met at other conventions. As a person with hearing loss, I find name tags one of the most gratifying aspects of convention. I am bad at hearing names and bad at remembering them, which makes it hard to initiate a conversation with someone new, and sometimes even with people I know quite well, when the mind balks at remembering. Name tags do the work for me.

Almost everyone at Convention is hard of hearing, and accommodations are provided as a matter of course.  It’s fun – and also something of a relief – to be the norm for a change. Next year’s Convention is in Rochester, N.Y., home to what may be HLAA’s largest chapter as well as the Rochester Institute of Technology and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. If any city in America can be said to specialize in hearing loss, Rochester is it.

 

What Does a Hearing Aid Cost?

What does a hearing aid cost? At the moment, nobody really knows.

We’ve heard anecdotally about cheaper hearing aids, more places to buy them, non-traditional hearing aids, and unprecedented insurance coverage. Hearing Tracker, HLAA and I put together this survey to see if we could spot some trends.

Please fill out this survey so we have a better idea about the state of the business. Hearing Tracker will report on the results in a few weeks.

And please share it with other hearing aid users. Here’s the link again: