Good News! For a change.

Good news for people with hearing loss.

Last week CMS, which runs Medicare and Medicaid, reversed itself on an earlier proposal to eliminate coverage for bone-anchored cochlear implants, like Cochlear’s Baha and Oticon’s Ponto.

This is good news for two reasons.

First, it preserves coverage for an important and expensive technology. People with certain kinds of hearing loss, including that resulting from acoustic neuroma, can’t be treated with hearing aids or conventional cochlear implants. The bone-anchored devices, which have been implanted in 40,000 Americans since they were approved by the FDA and accepted for Medicare reimbursement in January 2006, affect people of all ages. Only 20 percent of these 40,000 procedures was covered by Medicare, according to the Hearing Industries Association. And in fact when CMS made its original proposal to end coverage it noted that it wouldn’t save Medicare a substantial amount of money.

Medicare’s decision not only ensures that these devices will continue to be available on Medicare but also will have a so-called ripple affect. Private insurance companies often follow Medicare’s lead in coverage guidelines.

And these devices are expensive (although not as expensive as conventional cochlear implants, which both Medicare and private insurers generally cover). Cochlear Americas estimated that the national average “bundled” rate (which includes physician and audiologist services), is $9732 if the surgery is done on a hospital outpatient basis.

The second piece of good news is that this was accomplished as a result of a public campaign against the proposed changed. Cochlear Americas got it started but CMS received more than 4,070 comments, and 11,300 signatures on a petition, according to the Acoustic Neuroma Society. The people’s voices were heard!

Let’s all remember that the next time CMS or some other seemingly behemoth government agency proposes to cut back coverage of an essential device or procedure.

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